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Using the KitchenAid Ravioli Maker Attachment for Homemade Pasta

By Henrik Hansen

Back in the day, there was something relaxing and cozy about making ravioli by hand. Perhaps it was done in the big sunny kitchen of one's nonni when a person was a child, and they helped make the dough and roll it out, then make the little squares, fill them with prosciutto, or pesto, or ricotta cheese, or squash, or whatever filling the family preferred. They used that little crimping tool, sealed everything with an egg wash, then slid the little squares into the big pot of boiling water for only a few minutes, and they were done, and served with nonni's best sauce.

A person can still help their nonni make the Sunday ravioli, except now they can help her with the KitchenAid ravioli maker. The ravioli maker is an attachment that's compatible with any KitchenAid stand mixer.This ravioli maker's six-inch roller is wide enough to make three rows of large ravioli, and comes with a scoop to fill them up. The machine also crimps and pinches the ravioli securely shut, so no worries about everything unraveling once it hits the boiling water. The roller is easy to attach to the stand mixer and, best of all, the cleanup is easy. Making hand-made ravioli could be as messy as it was fun, but this attachment comes with its own cleaning brush.The reviews for the KitchenAid ravioli maker were a bit mixed, though some cooks admitted that a learning curve was necessary before they got the hang of using the machine. One customer wrote in that the machine takes a bit of getting used to and that semolina and unbleached white flour was the best to use for it. Another customer warned that the dough shouldn't be too dry when it's put through the roller.

Others had to experiment to get the right thickness of dough so the dough wouldn't tear as it went through the roller. The right thickness was essential to keep the ravioli from coming apart when it was put in the boiling water. Another customer said that the thickness setting for the ravioli maker had to be set on 3, every time and without exception, and that a sheet of ravioli shouldn't be allowed to get too long because it would cause the dough to warp, stretch or tear. Others said a customer should practice on making ravioli with no filling first.YouTube videos were also available to teach the cook just how to use the ravioli maker.

Customers tended to find the videos very helpful. The KitchenAid ravioli maker can be found in just about every online store where appliances are sold, though some stores only sell the product on-line, and some customers expressed frustration that it wasn't kept in stock in some places. The KitchenAid warranty is "hassle-free," which means if the ravioli maker breaks down before the first year is up KitchenAid replaces it at no charge. They'll bring a replacement to the customer's house, set up the return of the old appliance, or give a one year guarantee for a new appliance.

For more information on other Stand Mixer reviews [http://standmixerreviews.info] such as the Kitchenaid Pasta Roller Attachment [http://standmixerreviews.info/kitchenaid-mixer-attachments/kitchenaid-pasta-roller-attachment], visit our website dedicated to kitchen appliances.

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